Is there a fair price for a concert ticket?

In 2012, the cheapest ticket to see The Rolling Stones on their tour on England, it was £106, including booking fee, while the VIP hospitality ticket goes to £1,440. (You can check it out the full article in this link: http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-20066145 ). 

While the fans were angry, the musicians have not total agree. Anyway, according to this article of the BBC, the ticket prices “have soared over the last decade as revenues from recorded music have gone down”. 

The statistics show that the price of the tickets have increased through the time: “between 1982 and 2012 the average cost of a gig ticket increased by 400 per cent, and according to Statista the worldwide average cost of a concert ticket now stands at $78.77 (£59.94)”. (You can check it out the full article in this link: https://www.google.com.mx/amp/www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/are-gigs-getting-too-expensive-radiohead-bjork-beyonc-pet-shop-boys-a7158706.html%3famp )

Also, it’s a reality that almost all of the top highest-paid musicians made the bulk of their money from touring. According to Business Insider, among the 20 Music stars people paid the most to see in 2016 were:

– Blink 182 (Average ticket price for their tour $76, Average ticket price for their top show $110)

– Twenty One Pilots (Average ticket price for their tour $108, Average ticket price for their top show $140)

– The Cure (Average ticket price for their tour $122, Average ticket price for their top show $171)

– Guns N’ Roses (Average ticket price for their tour $176, Average ticket price for their top show $378)

– Justin Bieber (Average ticket price for their tour $232, Average ticket price for their top show $386)

– Adele (Average ticket price for their tour $469, Average ticket price for their top show $708)
(You can check it out the full list in this link: https://www.google.com.mx/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/most-expensive-concerts-artists-2016-12 )

According to The Independient, “Jeff Craft, head of X Ray Touring agency, says ‘hugely increased touring costs’ are often behind the bigger prices. ‘Equipment hire, trucking, crew wages, catering and every other aspect of touring is more and more expensive – especially at the highest level where audiences expect to see huge productions. The competition between artists at this level is intense so the costs continue to spiral upwards.’  

And the economics of touring are complex: “Many big acts do not break even until they have been on the road for weeks, or even months. Production costs range from hiring trucks, pyrotechnics and video screens to catering expenses, hotel rooms and insurance. Even when acts secure sponsorship from big-name brands, some of those costs are inevitably passed on to the fan”.

What’s a reasonable price, then? “For some, it’s a question of scale. ‘If we play a show in London, £10 or £15 seems fair,’ says Joe Newman of up-and-coming art-rock outfit Alt-J”, according to the BBC article. Also, depends of the production of the show: some artists like Muse or Björk have great production: “I was told production costs for a visual extravaganza were the principal reason Björk, a unique, critically acclaimed artist but hardly a best seller, is charging so much”. 

In this case, it’s a risk that assume the promoters and agents, cause generally they pay a price for the entire show to the artists: the “risk to promoters is extremely high, because their margins are so tight. They only make money if 99% of the house sells out.” ( https://www.google.com.mx/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2013/jun/05/gig-tickets-expensive-blog

Finally, the fans’ answer will be the lower price. 

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